Ep. 94: How Stress Crashes Your Metabolism & Why Hormesis Is NOT The Answer (Stress & Mitochondria Part 2)

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In this episode we discuss:

  • Why uncoupling is harmful in certain contexts and how PUFA cause constant, low-level uncoupling
  • The involvement of uncoupling, mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy, heat shock proteins, and hypoxia-inducible factors in the stress response
  • How stress prevents our mitochondria from effectively producing energy
  • How chronic stress causes insulin resistance, high blood pressure, weight gain, depression, and cardiovascular disease
  • How sugar and fat cravings result from stress and why listening to them is beneficial
  • How adaptations to stress get passed on through generations

2:59 – the details of how mitochondrial respiration can become disrupted, especially from glucocorticoids

6:05 – the short-term effects of catecholamines

8:34 – why uncoupling is harmful in certain contexts and how PUFA cause constant, low-level uncoupling

14:40 – the protective effects of uncoupling as a part of the stress response

20:08 – the role of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6, heat-shock proteins, NF-kB, HIF) in the stress response

37:33 – the effect of acute stress on energy production in mitochondria

45:18– the effect of chronic stress on energy production in mitochondria

48:15 – how stress drives degeneration and the evidence for increased activity of hormetic pathways (including effects like mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy) in degenerative states

56:12 – the effect of chronic stress on appetite, cravings for sugar and fats, and binging, and why consuming carbs and fats doesn’t cause fat gain

1:05:24 – the relationship between mental health, mood, and metabolic function

1:10:21 – how adaptations to stress get passed on through mitochondrial DNA

1:18:32 – how to best improve mitochondrial function and our health

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1Comment
  • Panagiotis Kottas
    Posted at 06:32h, 28 November Reply

    Although I appreciate (and enjoyed!) the review and how you approach health and energy, it would be good to also review in a follow-up podcast one of the several studies showing that ketones have a protective effect against ROS. For example “Effects of ketogenic diet on oxidative stress and cancer: A literature review”.

    As a person doing keto and coaching people to do keto, I always aim to help people find the right balance and include adaptations that make them stronger. You referred to this many times in the podcast, but you tried to bypass the beneficial effects of certain stressors.

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